Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Social Dilemma

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by KUGDI View Post
    I’d like to think of us as more of the anti-social network.
    Or a Socially Distant Network

    Comment


    • #47
      I miss Fro.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by FrobozMumbar View Post
        A little over a week ago, I deleted my Facebook and Instagram accounts and I am now 100% social media free (present location excluded, of course) -- it is truly liberating.

        As part of this endeavour, I also trekked into the realm of Google to see just how invasive their bullshit business model is as well. That, too, was eye-opening, and resulted in many settings changes and mass deletions. I know I can't live 100% digital-footprint free, but in the words of the prophets, I am trying to recapture my inner-Analog Kid and kill the Digital Man.
        I can’t bring myself to delete Facebook yet, but I blocked the feed on desktop with a css sheet and deleted the IG app from my phone, so now I rarely go on either.

        I’ve thought a lot about the answers to all this. I don’t know what they are, but I do think it has to start with regulation. In particular, regulation that gives people ownership of their data should be very powerful. Require companies to show users all the data they collect and how they use it, and give them the option to delete that data, port it somewhere else, or monetize it.

        Another random thought I had, a user boycott against Facebook with a specific list of demands would be insanely effective I think. The best part is you don’t even need people to fully boycott. Something like:

        - turn off your ad personalization
        - use FB/IG 50% less
        - make a conscious effort to never click an ad

        would absolutely destroy Facebook’s revenue. And it asks very little of the users.

        Advertiser boycotts, which is something we’ve already seen, do very close to nothing at all. But user boycotts will send those companies into a full-blown panic.

        Comment


        • #49
          TikTok is the fasting growing new social media (over 300 million new users since last year) and it's Chinese owned. Snapchat and Reddit are the next 2 biggest growing social media platforms in the last year. But TikTok blows them away.

          Comment


          • #50
            MENLO PARK, CA—In an effort to curtail the organization’s outsized influence, Facebook announced Monday that it would be implementing new steps to ensure the breakup of the U.S. government before it becomes too powerful. “It’s long past time for us to take concrete actions against this behemoth of governance that has gone essentially unchecked since its inception,” said Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, noting that while the governing body may have begun with good intentions, its history showed a culture of recklessness and a dangerous disregard for the consequences of its decisions. “Unfortunately, those at the top have been repeatedly contemptuous of the very idea of accountability or reform, and our only remaining course is to separate the government into smaller chunks to prevent it from forming an even stronger monopoly over the public.” Zuckerberg closed his remarks with repeated assurances that despite a likely legal battle ahead, no one government could stand up to the fortitude of Facebook.

            Comment


            • #51
              Is that from The Onion or The Heritage Foundation?

              Comment


              • #52
                I Talked to the Cassandra of the Internet Age


                The internet rewired our brains. He predicted it would.


                Excerpt:

                In June 2006, when Facebook was still months from launching its News Feed, Mr. Goldhaber predicted the grueling personal effects of a life mediated by technologies that feed on our attention and reward those best able to command it. “In an attention economy, one is never not on, at least when one is awake, since one is nearly always paying, getting or seeking attention.”

                More than a decade later, Mr. Goldhaber lives a quiet, mostly retired life. He has hardly any current online footprint, except for a Twitter account he mostly uses to occasionally share posts from politicians. I found him by calling his landline. But we are living in the world he sketched out long ago. Attention has always been currency, but as we’ve begun to live our lives increasingly online, it’s now the currency. Any discussion of power is now, ultimately, a conversation about attention and how we extract it, wield it, waste it, abuse it, sell it, lose it and profit from it.


                The big tech platform debates about online censorship and content moderation? Those are ultimately debates about amplification and attention. Same with the crisis of disinformation. It’s impossible to understand the rise of Donald Trump and the MAGA wing of the far right or, really, modern American politics without understanding attention hijacking and how it is used to wield power. Even the recent GameStop stock rally and the Reddit social media fallout share this theme, illustrating a universal truth about the attention economy: Those who can collectively commandeer enough attention can accumulate a staggering amount of power quickly. And it’s never been easier to do than it is right now.


                -
                Last edited by FrobozMumbar; 4 weeks ago.

                Comment


                • #53
                  In a similar vein to what Fro just posted, I started watching Fake Famous on HBO Max last night. I am only about 10 minutes in, but the gist is that they interviewed some small to middling social media participants (e.g., none had big followings). They selected 3 to work with and didn't select the obvious choices who looked they could grow an audience on their own. They are going to work with these 3 to see wether they can create social media influencers out of them. I guess I'll find out tonight. https://www.hbo.com/documentaries/fake-famous

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by FrobozMumbar View Post
                    I Talked to the Cassandra of the Internet Age


                    The internet rewired our brains. He predicted it would.


                    Excerpt:

                    In June 2006, when Facebook was still months from launching its News Feed, Mr. Goldhaber predicted the grueling personal effects of a life mediated by technologies that feed on our attention and reward those best able to command it. “In an attention economy, one is never not on, at least when one is awake, since one is nearly always paying, getting or seeking attention.”

                    More than a decade later, Mr. Goldhaber lives a quiet, mostly retired life. He has hardly any current online footprint, except for a Twitter account he mostly uses to occasionally share posts from politicians. I found him by calling his landline. But we are living in the world he sketched out long ago. Attention has always been currency, but as we’ve begun to live our lives increasingly online, it’s now the currency. Any discussion of power is now, ultimately, a conversation about attention and how we extract it, wield it, waste it, abuse it, sell it, lose it and profit from it.


                    The big tech platform debates about online censorship and content moderation? Those are ultimately debates about amplification and attention. Same with the crisis of disinformation. It’s impossible to understand the rise of Donald Trump and the MAGA wing of the far right or, really, modern American politics without understanding attention hijacking and how it is used to wield power. Even the recent GameStop stock rally and the Reddit social media fallout share this theme, illustrating a universal truth about the attention economy: Those who can collectively commandeer enough attention can accumulate a staggering amount of power quickly. And it’s never been easier to do than it is right now.


                    -
                    I think this is sort of the premise of many episodes of the series Black Mirror. Black Mirror is a great show to show us the potential dangers of our current day-to-day technology and where it is potentially headed.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      If you haven’t read it, pick up a copy of “Future Shock” from the library or a used book store. Talked about the post Industrial age that we were entering. Published in 1970 so some of it is very dated but some his observations about people feeling disconnected from society are important. I can see where social media provides a sense of community/stability that former institutions provided for some people.Which is a problem when your community is white supremacy.

                      Toffler had some pretty accurate forecasts. Interactive media and chat rooms for example. Work from home as well.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        I read this a long time ago. I think maybe I was in middle school or something. I think a lot of it went over my head at the time, but I did enjoy the book and as I recall, it was a fairly easy read. I'll have to see if I can find a copy and read it again.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by sean View Post
                          In a similar vein to what Fro just posted, I started watching Fake Famous on HBO Max last night. I am only about 10 minutes in, but the gist is that they interviewed some small to middling social media participants (e.g., none had big followings). They selected 3 to work with and didn't select the obvious choices who looked they could grow an audience on their own. They are going to work with these 3 to see wether they can create social media influencers out of them. I guess I'll find out tonight. https://www.hbo.com/documentaries/fake-famous
                          Well, I don't want to spoil it, but not everyone is cut out to become artificially famous. But a lot of influencers can do it really well. Some people crumble under the pressure and some simply only seek real validation from real people even if free bot validation is given to them. The 3 individuals followed run the gamut.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X