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  • Originally posted by KUGDI View Post

    So you’re saying all these variants of this Asian Coronavirus all pretty much look the same?
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    • TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) - Kansas is almost dead last when it comes to getting the vaccine out--48th out of all 50 U.S. states.

      It seems that Kansas continues to struggle in getting the vaccine out. We are second from last according to Becker’s Hospital Review. The medical industry magazine examined CDC data and found Kansas ahead of only Alaska and Alabama in the percentage of Covid-19 vaccines administered as of Tuesday morning.

      According to Becker’s, Kansas has received more than 492,000 vaccines and given more than 300,000 doses. That’s just shy of 62%.

      Now the Kansas dashboard does report having given nearly 600 more doses, but that can potentially be explained by the simple lag in data reporting time.

      We have been communicating with both KDHE and the Governor’s office over the past few days regarding this story--but they’ve yet to issue an official response to why the state seems to be struggling to get the doses they receive distributed more quickly to Kansans.

      Alabama comes in last--little more than 58% of vaccines received have been distributed.

      North Dakota is leading the nation with more than 98%. That means nearly all vaccines coming into that state are quickly going back out the door and into the arms of North Dakotans.



      This last statement from the news article is consistent with the rapidly declining infection rate in North Dakota. For whatever reason, those folks up there got the message and are doing something about it.

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      • Well, we can't all be number 1.

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        • I think that by early April, the supply-demand challenge will flip: As we move along the tiers and the AstraZeneca and J&J vaccines are approved for US rollout, it will be more about outreach, improving the signup process (which the public sector has thus far failed miserably at, hopefully it will improve, and if not the private sector should be better either way) and persuading skeptics.

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          • Originally posted by NoPantsChico View Post
            I think that by early April, the supply-demand challenge will flip: As we move along the tiers and the AstraZeneca and J&J vaccines are approved for US rollout, it will be more about outreach, improving the signup process (which the public sector has thus far failed miserably at, hopefully it will improve, and if not the private sector should be better either way) and persuading skeptics.
            I suspect you are right. It does appear based on what I'm hearing that places like Walgreens, CVS, Walmart, etc., don't have the vaccines in their stores, yet (the ones in Kansas). It sounds like they may get them within the next week or so. Up to this point, the state has been relying on hospitals and nursing facilities to do their vaccinations. In the very near future, community health centers, pharmacies and local doctors offices are likely to start getting vaccines and they will probably do a better job of advertising that they are available. Once people know that the vaccines are available, they should start lining up to get them.

            It appears that part of the issue at this point has been that most facilities don't have the cold-storage units necessary to distribute vaccines to some of these places.

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            • Originally posted by MissTCShore View Post

              I suspect you are right. It does appear based on what I'm hearing that places like Walgreens, CVS, Walmart, etc., don't have the vaccines in their stores, yet (the ones in Kansas). It sounds like they may get them within the next week or so. Up to this point, the state has been relying on hospitals and nursing facilities to do their vaccinations. In the very near future, community health centers, pharmacies and local doctors offices are likely to start getting vaccines and they will probably do a better job of advertising that they are available. Once people know that the vaccines are available, they should start lining up to get them.

              It appears that part of the issue at this point has been that most facilities don't have the cold-storage units necessary to distribute vaccines to some of these places.
              In Kansas right now they don't need them, just leave them outside until you are ready to use them, then bring them inside to thaw, lol.

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              • Psychotic symptoms in COVID-19 patients. A retrospective descriptive study


                Psychotic symptoms have been related to other coronavirus infections. We conducted a single-centre retrospective and observational study to describe new-onset psychotic episodes in COVID-19 patients. Ten patients infected by the novel coronavirus with psychotic symptoms and no previous history of psychosis were identified by the emergency and liaison psychiatry departments. Nine of the cases presented with psychotic symptoms at least two weeks after the first somatic manifestations attributed to COVID-19 and receiving pharmacological treatment. Structured delusions mixed with confusional features were the most frequent clinical presentations. Hence, COVID-19 patients can develop psychotic symptoms as a consequence of multiple concurrent factors.


                (For what it's worth, one of the psychologists I work with told me that we've seen cases similar to this in the Kansas City area. While this study included only 10 patients, it is apparently not uncommon.)

                https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7311337/

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                • I believe it. Tis a pernicious little fucker that invades just about every system in the body. Even though I've been "over" it for a couple weeks now, I still have random weird symptoms that I attribute to my body still trying to eradicate it from all corners of my body.

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                  • One thing I haven’t been able to get a handle on is how many of these scary side effects are normal.

                    Like the myocarditis stuff. I’ve read that covid causes it but also that the cold or flu does too. I’ve yet to really see the risk compared. Maybe we just don’t know yet.

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                    • Originally posted by LARPHawk View Post
                      One thing I haven’t been able to get a handle on is how many of these scary side effects are normal.

                      Like the myocarditis stuff. I’ve read that covid causes it but also that the cold or flu does too. I’ve yet to really see the risk compared. Maybe we just don’t know yet.
                      Pretty much any coronavirus or flu virus can cause temporary myocarditis, media been blowing that symptom out of proportion cause it sounds like a big scary word. If a person is generally heart healthy it's not really an issue.

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                      • Flu viruses and other similar viruses can cause a lot of the side effects we see from COVID (although, often less severe), but I think it's pretty rare to see the amount of neurological effects that COVID is causing. Loss of smell, for example, is a neurological issue. As I understand, the virus is invading the neurons leading from the olfactory receptors to the brain. From there, it's a small leap to head right into the brain, itself, presumably, although I don't know that this is actually happening, or if this is the cause of psychosis. Again, this isn't really my area, so I'm speculating, here. But the neurological effects of COVID are pretty well documented and reported.

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                        • Originally posted by MissTCShore View Post
                          Flu viruses and other similar viruses can cause a lot of the side effects we see from COVID (although, often less severe), but I think it's pretty rare to see the amount of neurological effects that COVID is causing. Loss of smell, for example, is a neurological issue. As I understand, the virus is invading the neurons leading from the olfactory receptors to the brain. From there, it's a small leap to head right into the brain, itself, presumably, although I don't know that this is actually happening, or if this is the cause of psychosis. Again, this isn't really my area, so I'm speculating, here. But the neurological effects of COVID are pretty well documented and reported.
                          Yeah, my smell is just barely starting to return. I can still taste stuff ok, but with like 90% of taste being smell, it's very muted.

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                          • I just got a text to schedule my first vaccine. I am caller #171. 12 minutes I called and I was #171 then as well. I hope to schedule before I go to bed tonight.

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                            • Originally posted by sean View Post
                              I just got a text to schedule my first vaccine. I am caller #171. 12 minutes I called and I was #171 then as well. I hope to schedule before I go to bed tonight.
                              Thoughts and prayers, bruv.

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                              • I was #171 for 25 minutes. Then suddenly it was my turn. Monday is my day.

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