Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Huge College Admissions Bust

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Huge College Admissions Bust

    FBI accuses wealthy parents, including celebrities, in college-entrance bribery scheme

    The Justice Department on Tuesday charged 50 people — including two television stars — with being part of a long-running bribery scheme to get privileged children with lackluster grades into big-name colleges and universities. The alleged crimes included cheating on entrance exams, as well as bribing college officials to say certain students were coming to compete on athletic teams when those students were not in fact athletes, officials said. Numerous schools were targeted, including Georgetown University, Yale University, Stanford University, the University of Texas, the University of Southern California and UCLA, among others.

    Boston’s U.S. attorney, Andrew Lelling, called it the largest-ever college admissions scam prosecuted by the Justice Department. Of the 50 people charged as part of the FBI’s Operation Varsity Blues, 33 were parents, officials said, warning that the investigation is ongoing and that others could be charged.

    Two participants in the scheme are scheduled to enter guilty pleas Tuesday afternoon, prosecutors said. One is William Singer, a well-connected college admissions adviser and the central figure in the scheme, officials said. He is accused of disguising the bribery scheme as a charity, enabling parents to deduct the bribes from their taxes. Singer is charged with taking about $25 million from 2011 to 2018 — paying some of it to college coaches or standardized-testing officials for their help rigging the admissions process and pocketing the rest, according to the criminal complaint. He allegedly disguised the money using a nonprofit, the Key Worldwide Foundation, prosecutors said, characterizing it as a slush fund for bribes.

    One of the cooperating witnesses, according to court documents, is a former head coach of Yale’s women’s soccer team, who pleaded guilty in the case nearly a year ago and has since been helping FBI agents gather evidence. That coach, Rudolph Meredith, allegedly took a $400,000 bribe to pretend to place a student on the team and help get her into the school, even though the student did not play competitive soccer, officials said. The student’s parents paid $1.2 million in bribes, officials said.


    Lori Loughlin -- Aunt Becky from "Full House" -- and Felicity Huffman are among those charged. It's not news that rich people use their money and influence to get their kids into schools they'd otherwise have no shot at, but the depth of the scam is what's fascinating to me (along with the names, of course).

  • #2
    At least nine athletic coaches and 33 parents were among those charged in the investigation, including current University of Texas tennis coach Michael Center, who played tennis at KU from 1983 to 1986, coached the KU women’s tennis team from 1989 to 1992 and coached the KU men’s tennis team from 1992 until 1996.
    lol, how fucking dumb is your kid if you need to bribe someone to get your kid admitted to KU or UT?

    Comment


    • #3
      Poor Lori Loughlin. She will need to be comforted and I volunteer to be there for her. On account of I care.

      Comment


      • #4
        Desperate Housewife indeed.

        Comment


        • #5

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by KUGDI View Post

            lol, how fucking dumb is your kid if you need to bribe someone to get your kid admitted to KU or UT?
            It's actually very difficult to get into UT.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by EasyDisease View Post

              It's actually very difficult to get into UT.
              I get it’s more difficult than KU, sure, but let’s not act like a minimum SAT/ACT of “above average” or GPA of “above average” are like getting into Stanford.

              If you cant get into UT or KU, well, that’s why god created Texas State and Kansas State.

              Comment


              • #8
                At least nine athletic coaches and 33 parents were among those charged in the investigation, including current University of Texas tennis coach Michael Center, who played tennis at KU from 1983 to 1986, coached the KU women’s tennis team from 1989 to 1992 and coached the KU men’s tennis team from 1992 until 1996.
                I had a roommate during this time that was on the men's tennis team and I got to know most of the guys on the tennis team. Mike was a good guy and competitive and won a lot of matches. Very interesting to see how people's lives take a dramatic turn for the worse.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by swidman View Post
                  I had a roommate during this time that was on the men's tennis team and I got to know most of the guys on the tennis team. Mike was a good guy and competitive and won a lot of matches. Very interesting to see how people's lives take a dramatic turn for the worse.
                  Sounds like he wasn’t making the living he thought he deserved. Perhaps he should have chosen a field besides college tennis coach.... Sad to see.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My wife is a standardized test prodigy. Her GMAT score was 780 the first time she took it. Second time it was 790. She took the Law school test, on a whim, and was in the top 5% of scores. I mention this because as a financially challenged grad student she was offered $5,000 to take the GMAT for a woman. Tuition at Kellog was $3,000 a quarter at the time. Could have pulled it off, the controls weren’t that stringent. She was tempted but couldn’t do it. Needless to say this stuff has been going on forever.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KUGDI View Post

                      I get it’s more difficult than KU, sure, but let’s not act like a minimum SAT/ACT of “above average” or GPA of “above average” are like getting into Stanford.

                      If you cant get into UT or KU, well, that’s why god created Texas State and Kansas State.
                      I get your point with respect to KU, but I reiterate that it's VERY difficult to get into UT undergrad. I went to law school at UT with some brilliant people who wanted to go to UT for undergrad but couldn't get in. Basically, if you're (a) white, and (b) not in the top 7% of your graduating class (at your specific high school, not statewide), then you ain't gettting in. It's a race-neutral affirmative action policy that ends up punishing kids who attend good high schools.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by EasyDisease View Post

                        I get your point with respect to KU, but I reiterate that it's VERY difficult to get into UT undergrad. I went to law school at UT with some brilliant people who wanted to go to UT for undergrad but couldn't get in. Basically, if you're (a) white, and (b) not in the top 7% of your graduating class (at your specific high school, not statewide), then you ain't gettting in. It's a race-neutral affirmative action policy that ends up punishing kids who attend good high schools.
                        If you had a standardized test score well into the 99th percentile would that overcome meeting parts a and b?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It makes me sad there are dumb people in this world.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LARPHawk View Post

                            If you had a standardized test score well into the 99th percentile would that overcome meeting parts a and b?
                            Not necessarily. If you graduate in the top 7% of your class, you are granted automatic admission (this is actually a state law, btw). If you're in the top 7% of your class, your race doesn't matter. (As originally enacted, it was the top 10%, but that number has decreased along with demographic changes to around 7% currently). Those admissions account for 80+% of the incoming freshman class. The remaining < 20% are discretionary admissions based upon a holistic review of applicants. Race is one factor that is considered. Yes, test scores are also considered. But would an otherwise unimpressive applicant, e.g. someone with no soft variables and a shitty GPA, be admitted based on acing the SAT? It's possible, but by no means certain.

                            by the way, I'm not saying I necessarily disagree with the policy or that it's otherwise wrong or unconstitutional. In fact, SCOTUS has upheld it twice. I do think it's interesting that it incentivizes people to attend shittier schools to increase their admissions prospects. That may be a good thing. It also uses the de facto segregation of certain school districts as a way to guarantee some minimal number of diverse students gain admission.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by KUGDI View Post
                              It makes me sad there are dumb people in this world.
                              Dumb people serve a valuable role in society. I, for one, wouldn't want to live in a world without stupid naked chicks swinging on poles for cash.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X