Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

[Serious] Let's solve the illegal immigration crisis

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Weed is completely legal for recreation use here in CA and literally no one that I know who smokes weed - and I know a LOT of people who smoke weed - buy it legally. To the last person, they all still go through their same old dealers because it's cheaper and the weed is better. From what I've seen, the only people buying weed and weed related products commercially are Asians, old people who "always wanted to try it" and whatever millennial tech-dork yuppies are called - basically people who would not know how to find a legitimate drug dealer. I can tell you that there are two weed stores within a block and a half in either direction from my house. These places are not hopping, business-wise. They look empty most of the time when I pass by.

    Comment


    • Also, I know for a fact - from a professional standpoint - that the illegal grow business is alive and well in the far reaches of the Northern California forests. The ones that are all manned by the shoot first and then shoot some more law-abiding illegals that are affectionately known as MS-13 and other cartel cronies. When LEOs go after them it's with military tactics and multi-agency task forces complete with air-assaults from helicopters. The thing is, they still need weed that they can move to jurisdictions where it is illegal, and weed grows really well here, and in places like Oregon and Washington. And there are plenty of locally-owned (read: non-cartel) illegal grow operations operated by people used to growing illegally and are not inclined to start in with the whole regulations and tax things.

      Comment


      • Not an expert by any means, but I’ve read a handful of articles that discuss the challenges pot retailers face with payment processing. People carry less cash around than they used to, but even though weed is legal, credit card companies often reject payments to comply with federal laws, leaving retailers to source payment processing offshore, which is legal but also unregulated, costly and slow compared to “normal” retailers.
        Last edited by NoPantsChico; 1 week ago.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by robinsonjim View Post

          I agree very strongly with your basic premise, Bro Kugdi. Can you flesh out how it would lead to MORE ACTUAL slave labor? Not disagreeing...I just am not following how you get from Point A to Point B.
          It's a concern anytime government gets involved, as basically it often has the unintended side effect of driving markets underground to black market activity. If someone is acting unethically and illegally and treating immigrants as the borderline slave labor to line their pockets today, they likely aren't going to suddenly say "whelp, now it's illegal, I'm just going to cut my profit margins" tomorrow. If they can't hire people for dollars an hour, some will flat out turn to slave labor. So while I'm in favor of the idea, I want to be deliberate in how it is approached, written, and enforced so that we get it right. If we rush it through we're likely to get shit legislation which will give us shit results. And when you are dealing with vulnerable people, we can't afford to get it wrong if we want to be an ethical society.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by FrobozMumbar View Post
            Weed is completely legal for recreation use here in CA and literally no one that I know who smokes weed - and I know a LOT of people who smoke weed - buy it legally. To the last person, they all still go through their same old dealers because it's cheaper and the weed is better. From what I've seen, the only people buying weed and weed related products commercially are Asians, old people who "always wanted to try it" and whatever millennial tech-dork yuppies are called - basically people who would not know how to find a legitimate drug dealer. I can tell you that there are two weed stores within a block and a half in either direction from my house. These places are not hopping, business-wise. They look empty most of the time when I pass by.
            Here's a good article about it. It's an Associated Press article, I just found it through this news outlet.
            It was supposed to be a great year for marijuana entrepreneur Brian Blatz. When California broadly legalized pot on Jan. 1, the lawyer with a background in banking and health care had been working for a year to set up a trucking company that would whisk fragrant marijuana buds, infused juices and...

            Comment


            • Originally posted by markhawk View Post

              Americans buy legal weed, get taxed on it, and that tax money is used to build the wall...but Mexico paid for it?
              Yes, cause that same money, is not longer going to Mexico. It's called SPIN.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by drinky View Post

                Point 2) comes straight from government data, and it was even stated on Fox News last night right after Trump's speech . According to the data, all the "hard" drugs predominantly come across at normal points of entry, while weed is more often smuggled in at points that are not monitored. I don't have a link to the data immediately available, but I haven't seen any credible sources refute this point.
                I guess what I'm getting at is how do they know where the majority is coming through? Do they have factual data or is it based on data models, ie very educated guesses?

                Comment


                • Originally posted by KUGDI View Post

                  I guess what I'm getting at is how do they know where the majority is coming through? Do they have factual data or is it based on data models, ie very educated guesses?
                  If they knew where, they'd stop it right? At the same time though, without proof, we can't say for sure that there is MORE coming through elsewhere. So we have to go with what we do know.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by KUGDI View Post

                    If people would call this what it is, which is borderline slave labor, I think you'd get a lot more support. Not all companies that hire illegals are terrible, but a lot certainly are. It's a terrible, terrible problem and humans get trapped in those situations. I'd be in favor of legislation that accomplishes this, but I'd be wary that all it might do is create actual slave labor in the US. I'd still say proceed, but proceed carefully and purposefully.
                    This is a valid point. And to that end, any draconian measures that I think we could, and should, take against illegal aliens needs to be balanced with a legitimate guest worker program. A program that meets the needs of employers, ensures foreign workers are not being exploited, and one that also does not lead to permanent residence or a path to citizenship. Literally a guest worker program that grants temporary work visas to unskilled labor on a limited and rotating basis. Harvest time? Apply, get bussed up and housed, get paid legally, get taxed, then take your earnings back to you family - and see you next year.

                    McDonald's, put in your kiosks and go pack to paying some pimple-faced kid a non-living wage to get part-time job experience flipping the burgers. Fries guy was never meant to be a career move in the first place.

                    All the other businesses, start paying a competitive wage and suddenly Americans will start doing those jobs that Americans don't want to do. No need to artificially raise the wage floor to $15+ an hour. If you take 11 million unskilled laborers out of the pool, the market will respond naturally. Yes, we would likely pay more for some (probably many) things, but also most of that money would stay here as well, as opposed to being Western Union'd to Guatemala every Friday.

                    This really shouldn't be that difficult.

                    /rant

                    Comment


                    • Wait a second. I wasn't aware that the Mexicans have these amazing vehicles, the best that money can buy, better than our law enforcement! Why didn't the liberal media tell me this. Now I'm pro-Wall !!! I'm not ashamed to change my mind when I receive new evidence!

                      Comment


                      • baja500-17-0680.jpg

                        Do you even Baja, Gard?

                        Comment


                        • 2015-score-baja-500-contingency-photos-utvunderground-33.jpg

                          score-baja500-vidosola-ford-head-on-lede.jpg

                          Comment


                          • car.jpg

                            Comment


                            • Yugo-Sibenik.jpg

                              Comment


                              • LOL

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X