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  • #31
    Had dinner with my immediate family at my aunt's house, which was a slight departure from our family tradition of having it at another aunt's house, but that aunt's health has been up and down as of late, so her sister decided to host instead. Got to catch up with some cousins who live out of town as well as their SO's who are all great people. And there were three dogs hanging out as well, so that was cool too.

    Lurch22 Sorry to hear about your pup.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by WolfShirtSophomore View Post

      Watch the Black Mirror episode "Nosedive" for a possible way this can go wrong. Also, quick question, do you believe social engineering is a good idea?
      Define "Social Engineering."

      As with many things, the answer to the question may not be a clear cut "Yes" or "No," but rather "Some good, some bad."

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      • #33
        I've seen Nosedive. I think it would be terrible to allow people to review each other like reviews on Amazon.com. But we already have this available for many transactions we make. Ebay, Uber, wavingthewheat, phog.net, etc. To be clear, I do not want what is happening in China to happen here, but I am curious to watch it play out from the outside and their society seems to be more open to this kind of approach. Perhaps this answers your question about social engineering, but I am not sure what you mean so I echo what MissTC noted.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by sean View Post
          I've seen Nosedive. I think it would be terrible to allow people to review each other like reviews on Amazon.com. But we already have this available for many transactions we make. Ebay, Uber, wavingthewheat, phog.net, etc. To be clear, I do not want what is happening in China to happen here, but I am curious to watch it play out from the outside and their society seems to be more open to this kind of approach. Perhaps this answers your question about social engineering, but I am not sure what you mean so I echo what MissTC noted.
          Fair enough. I will point out though, that those are not mandated/run by the government as China is doing. Also, how do you know the citizens are open to this social engineering? It's not like they have a choice.

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          • #35
            I have a ton of friends I've made in China across multiple visits to 6 cities, and I monitor WeChat daily, which makes it easy for me to translate what they are writing All but 4 of my "friends" on WeChat live in China. The folks I deal with are higher education types, so they may not have the same fears as people who are struggling to get by, etc. I've seen discussion about Jack Ma's Sesame Credit that seemed positive, but I just posed the question to a hundred or so of the friends I've made. Obviously, it's possible that nobody complains because they do not want to have their complaint monitored, so there's that, too. ;-) But I'll let you know.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by sean View Post
              I've seen Nosedive. I think it would be terrible to allow people to review each other like reviews on Amazon.com. But we already have this available for many transactions we make. Ebay, Uber, wavingthewheat, phog.net, etc. To be clear, I do not want what is happening in China to happen here, but I am curious to watch it play out from the outside and their society seems to be more open to this kind of approach. Perhaps this answers your question about social engineering, but I am not sure what you mean so I echo what MissTC noted.
              Slightly different, but there's already an issue people don't talk about enough which is that many of these platforms will ban you, permanently, with no explanation and no opportunity for appeal. I've been banned from PayPal for life without explanation or obvious cause. I've read about people banned from Facebook, Airbnb, Uber, etc.

              It's not a huge deal when there's healthy competition, but as industries become more consolidated it's even more problematic. What happens if you're a retailer banned from Amazon and lose access to 50% of the online retail market? What about if you're banned from Uber and Lyft in a world where taxis are defunct? Same for Facebook, Google, etc. On some level, you can be frozen out of the new economy with no process or recourse.

              Of course, our govt does it too. My gf was on the terrorist watch list and I looked into getting that fixed. Again, no due process and no opportunity to appeal with the agency. Your only recourse is to hire a lawyer out of your own pocket and sue the government. Even once you're suing them they still won't tell you if you're on the list, and of course afterwards they won't tell you if you've been removed. It's insane and there are millions of Americans on the list.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by LARPHawk View Post

                Slightly different, but there's already an issue people don't talk about enough which is that many of these platforms will ban you, permanently, with no explanation and no opportunity for appeal. I've been banned from PayPal for life without explanation or obvious cause. I've read about people banned from Facebook, Airbnb, Uber, etc.

                It's not a huge deal when there's healthy competition, but as industries become more consolidated it's even more problematic. What happens if you're a retailer banned from Amazon and lose access to 50% of the online retail market? What about if you're banned from Uber and Lyft in a world where taxis are defunct? Same for Facebook, Google, etc. On some level, you can be frozen out of the new economy with no process or recourse.

                Of course, our govt does it too. My gf was on the terrorist watch list and I looked into getting that fixed. Again, no due process and no opportunity to appeal with the agency. Your only recourse is to hire a lawyer out of your own pocket and sue the government. Even once you're suing them they still won't tell you if you're on the list, and of course afterwards they won't tell you if you've been removed. It's insane and there are millions of Americans on the list.
                What did your girlfriend do to show up on my list?

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by LARPHawk View Post

                  Slightly different, but there's already an issue people don't talk about enough which is that many of these platforms will ban you, permanently, with no explanation and no opportunity for appeal. I've been banned from PayPal for life without explanation or obvious cause. I've read about people banned from Facebook, Airbnb, Uber, etc.

                  It's not a huge deal when there's healthy competition, but as industries become more consolidated it's even more problematic. What happens if you're a retailer banned from Amazon and lose access to 50% of the online retail market? What about if you're banned from Uber and Lyft in a world where taxis are defunct? Same for Facebook, Google, etc. On some level, you can be frozen out of the new economy with no process or recourse.

                  Of course, our govt does it too. My gf was on the terrorist watch list and I looked into getting that fixed. Again, no due process and no opportunity to appeal with the agency. Your only recourse is to hire a lawyer out of your own pocket and sue the government. Even once you're suing them they still won't tell you if you're on the list, and of course afterwards they won't tell you if you've been removed. It's insane and there are millions of Americans on the list.
                  well, there is an easy solution, stop dating terrorists. i keed i keed

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                  • #39
                    I've received 1 response from a graduate student living here since August, but she is from China (I guess it's 2:41 in the morning in China so I won't get responses for many hours). This student tells me that she wants to see the gov't succeed in this venture because China is full of people selling counterfeit items and making fake claims and swindling people who are not savvy. She thinks this can help make people more honest. I posted a snippet from the BBC article because I doubt they can read the article in China (so I posted a screen shot). My guess is that the student who responded to me hasn't thought this through well because she is thinking about it from a consumer perspective instead of how the score might be assigned to her. She is also concerned that Alibaba is implementing this system when they are one of the worst offenders of selling counterfeit items.

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                    • #40
                      Just spotted on Instagram Screenshot_20181123-160344.jpg

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by sean View Post
                        Just spotted on Instagram Screenshot_20181123-160344.jpg

                        Internet should have quotes around it because of giant thumb their shitbag communist regime keeps on it.

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                        • #42
                          At least they don't really crack down on VPN use (at least not when I need it there). But yeah, the vast majority of people there have never used Facebook or Google. Maybe that should be a feature of China (kidding). They do have viable alternatives that have more than a billion users (anything popular instantly gains nearly that many users by default -- heh). WeChat is like Twitter and Facebook combined and has over a billion users and nearly everyone can use WeChat's pay (and they do -- WePay). The problem I run into is that I cannot set up WePay to work with any money that I have or any credit cards that I have . . . I'd need a Bank of China account and I tried and failed to get that done. Almost nobody uses cash any more, so they pay with WePay for most transactions. Sucks for tourists. And Baidu is a very sucky competitor to Google, but it's all they know, so it works.

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                          • #43
                            Next person to respond is a grad student who was at the M.I.T. of China and she heard my lecture there. She explains that she wasn't aware that China was doing this, but that is seems like it will solve a lot of problems that currently exist; however, she is concerned that it will be a problematic implementation to get it going.

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