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Childhood misconceptions - Sports Edition

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  • #16
    There are general rules and then there are narrow exceptions. Such is the way in all aspects of life. What's so frustrating about that?

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    • #17
      It took me a long time to wrap my head around scoring in tennis. Love-15-30-40 for a point...basically score 4 points to win a game...win six games for a set and then two out of three for a match. Once I got over this mysterious format it was time for the real doozy...hitting a stupid tennis ball with such perfection via one's tennis racket that it would curve and cause one's opponent to not be able to return serve or to hit it out of bounds. All the while somehow resisting the urge to smack the living shit out of the ball and watch it clear the fence. And to think that it was created back when jousting was the big attraction.

      Pole vaulting. How it went from being the ultimate dike sport to some crazy exercise in physics where the sole purpose of the sport changed from clearing a large stream without getting wet, ah yes...those dikes...to somehow irrationally bending a large fiberglass pole so that it rebounds and shoots you over a bar that you then clear while on your back. Reward is falling backwards onto large pads. Right. Go for it. I'll watch.

      Discus. I realize that it's a classics thing and a throwback to Ancient Greece but the only thing it succeeds in is making you look awkward. A shot putter is the stoutest person on the field. The javelin chucker pays homage to the hoplite armed with a spear. Discus is like...throw this disc from the side and hope for the best. The Scots historically made up for this head scratcher by rightfully tossing cabers. If you can balance a telephone pole and then throw it...doesn't matter how far it goes you've already won.

      In football, who the hell came up with the position names??? Quarterback/Fullback/Running back I get. What I don't get is Tight End...Offensive Tackle...Wide Receiver. Apart from the backfield, Guard and Center are the only names that makes sense. How is he tight? And no, he's not on the end if you have Wide Receivers deployed on either side. Why aren't they just called Receivers? What makes them wide?
      On D it doesn't get better either. Nose guard? Ok, Tackle/Down Lineman...that makes sense. Linebacker makes sense. Safety? Cornerback?
      More football...why can't linemen catch passes? They're all fat...if you let them catch passes they'd have to do more cardio. Everybody wins.

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      • #18
        Long snapper hits me right in my logical zen place tho

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        • #19
          Actually, all the ST positions. Kicker, punter, holder . . .

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          • #20
            I grew up in Philly so was a big timer Flyers fan. It was hard figuring out why refs let some fights go and quickly stopped others. Refs would let them stand around all day throwing punches. Throwing a punch while standing on skates was like having a slap fight. Once you are off your skates the power came back to your punch and the refs came in.

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            • #21



              In football, who the hell came up with the position names??? Quarterback/Fullback/Running back I get. What I don't get is Tight End...Offensive Tackle...Wide Receiver. Apart from the backfield, Guard and Center are the only names that makes sense. How is he tight? And no, he's not on the end if you have Wide Receivers deployed on either side. Why aren't they just called Receivers? What makes them wide?
              On D it doesn't get better either. Nose guard? Ok, Tackle/Down Lineman...that makes sense. Linebacker makes sense. Safety? Cornerback?
              More football...why can't linemen catch passes? They're all fat...if you let them catch passes they'd have to do more cardio. Everybody wins. [/QUOTE]

              Most of it goes back to the way football was played and evolved over the years. Football started with an end on each side of the formation. Over time one of the ends became a "split end" as passing became more common. That player was a smaller faster player who split out away from the tackle. The other end was a larger player who blocked first and caught passes second. That is your tight end.

              Then teams started taking a HB and started putting them on the opposite flank. That became the flanker. Then you could have a slot back, while in the backfield he would line up between the split end and the tackle. Teams started using a wingback. He would line up, in the backfield, but on the outside shoulder of the tight end. Got a little confusing. At some point in the 80s the names went away and they all became wide receivers as the passing game took over football. Now they are XYZ positions.

              Tackle came from one platoon football. They tended to make a lot of tackles so the name stuck. Offenses would run off tackle and the same guy played both positions.

              Defense, safety comes from the early days of football. Last line of defense. A safety valve. I'm not sure when but defensive halfbacks became cornerbacks during the 60s.

              I was a "Blood" end in a 5-2 defense. Usually lined up on the slot side of the offense. Everyone we played ran a slot I or T offense. Behind me in most cases was the "Monster" back.
              Blood end would be an outside LB today. The monster is a strong safety. Since I was an average player I studied up on the game.

              I'm sure your lives are more fulfilled having learned about the evolution of football position names. If you really want to be bored I could tell you about alternating offensive guards.

              Last edited by LifestyleJayhawk; 3 weeks ago.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by LifestyleJayhawk View Post



                Stick to wife swap stories!

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                • #23
                  At the Michigan football game yesterday, the announcer would see the ball get kicked into the end zone and stop in the end zone and then announce, "and the kickoff goes through the end zone." But it hadn't. That annoyed me enough to write it here.

                  In a related matter and perhaps explaining my first example, how can the kicking team not run down and jump on the ball sitting in the end zone without the catching team downing it? Once the ball settled in the end zone, the refs would blow the whistle. The kicking team should be able to kick the ball into the end zone as an on sides kick strategy.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by sean View Post
                    At the Michigan football game yesterday, the announcer would see the ball get kicked into the end zone and stop in the end zone and then announce, "and the kickoff goes through the end zone." But it hadn't. That annoyed me enough to write it here.

                    In a related matter and perhaps explaining my first example, how can the kicking team not run down and jump on the ball sitting in the end zone without the catching team downing it? Once the ball settled in the end zone, the refs would blow the whistle. The kicking team should be able to kick the ball into the end zone as an on sides kick strategy.
                    On a kickoff, I believe that the ball in your scenario should be considered a live ball until possessed and downed by the receiving team.

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                    • #25
                      Hmmm, I can't seem to find the college rule, but I do see this change at the NFL level:

                      No need to kneel

                      If a ball gets to the end zone and touches the ground, it’s an automatic touchback. There’s no need for a player to pick it up and kneel, or even catch a ball if it’s headed for the end zone and they don’t intend to return it.

                      This is a small time saver, but the goal is to blow a play dead earlier so that unnecessary collisions don’t happen. Under the previous rules, a player could take their time gathering a ball and kneeling while the coverage team and return team blockers still careened toward each other for no reason.

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                      • #26
                        All my life I had the thought that KU FB would never have hope of being good.

                        Today that has changed.

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