Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hope and Regret... and Hope.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hope and Regret... and Hope.

    45 years ago, we celebrated what I feel was one of the seminal moments in human history. Today in '72, Apollo 17 touched down at the Taurus-Littrow site. It marked the last time we as a nation went to the moon. I'm reminded of the incredible focus, the directed effort, the hours put in, the innovations created. All to expand our footprint as a species. To scratch that itch of exploration. Our efforts, that we can go this far. That we can push that boundary. These give me hope.

    That we haven't been back perhaps isn't much of a surprise, but I do regret it. I see the hurdles our space program gets thrown in front of it, and it scares me. I feel like every step we give up is a step we as a species will have to fight to get back. Exploration isn't just something we do, it's what we are. It's what has driven every major advancement in human history. That we thrust that away in hopes of maintaining the status quo terrifies me.

    But I do have hope. There are great minds today that are pushing those boundaries further and further. And those efforts are multiplying. We're seeing the greatest push to make this not just something a few chosen will do, but a cascading effort to achieve our manifest destiny. And I applaud them.
    Last edited by KUGDI; 12-11-17, 07:03 PM.

  • #2

    Comment


    • #3
      Seems a shame and I read that NASA and Trump want is to go back. I would be all for that if not to further test longer range expeditions to Mars and beyond.

      Or, maybe this is why we haven't gone back, https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird...go-aliens-NASA


      Comment


      • #4
        We need to expand. We need to move forward. Even if you don’t believe in destiny, it’s only a matter of time before something happens to destroy life on earth. We have so much to do still. We can be the Ancients, the Forerunners, the Asgaurdians, etc. Quit waiting for ET to come show us the way. Blaze that trail and humanity will follow.

        Getting back to the moon is just a step for us, but man is it a big one. Put together a semi-permanent scientific outpost, like Antarctica, made up of scientists from around the world. Logistically, it makes even more sense to launch our next efforts from our moon.

        And no, sending robots isn’t enough. It isn’t who and what we are. Yes there are risks. There are people willing to take those risks.

        Comment


        • #5
          The moon? Who gives a shit about the moon? On this date in 1981, Muhammad Ali fought for the last time, losing a unanimous decision to Trevor Fucking Berbick and ending one of the greatest boxing careers of all time. The moon. Go fuck yourself, space.

          Comment


          • #6
            Here's some hope, I hope: https://www.cnn.com/2017/12/11/polit...oon/index.html

            We ain't scared of no moon aliens

            Comment


            • #7
              As much as I love science and exploration and all the unforeseen advances it brings, I'd like to see more of a focus on Planet Earth. We're ass-raping this planet and most people don't seem to care.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Protist View Post
                As much as I love science and exploration and all the unforeseen advances it brings, I'd like to see more of a focus on Planet Earth. We're ass-raping this planet and most people don't seem to care.
                starwarsanewhope1.jpg

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dewarsrocks View Post
                  Here's some hope, I hope: https://www.cnn.com/2017/12/11/polit...oon/index.html

                  We ain't scared of no moon aliens
                  True story, I hadn’t seen this when I posted that earlier. This is good news. He’d probably describe it as tremendous, but I’ll settle for good.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Protist View Post
                    As much as I love science and exploration and all the unforeseen advances it brings, I'd like to see more of a focus on Planet Earth. We're ass-raping this planet and most people don't seem to care.
                    I agree, to some extent. It would be a big "Yay, Us" moment to get back to the moon, however, I think what we're doing on deep space exploration is far more important to learn about our small little place on our little blue marble is far more important than gathering a few moon rocks. I'd much rather those resources be used to reach out further than some dead rock following us. For the cost to get back to the moon, we could sink those resources into developing technology to take us further. I guess if it takes setting up something on the moon to do it, then sure, but it seems to me doing that is like building a gas station at the edge of your subdivision to help you make a drive to New York (assuming you don't live in Jersey or Pennsylvania).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Agree with Illinij. Let's do multiple deep space adventures in multiple directions with better robots and better cameras and better everything.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My concern is some of the issues that have come up with the folks who have had long term assignments on the ISS. There have been some pretty bad physical effects..impact to eyesight, muscle/bone deterioration among other things. What if the humans in our current form aren't capable of surviving long deep space journeys?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          From what I've read, using the moon as a launch point/refueling depot is key to having efficient space travel. It may not be worth it for a one time shot to Mars, but if we are ever going to have regular space travel, we need to use the moon. Plus, living on the moon will let us work out the kinks of living in space and figure out how to take care of the medical issues low gravity environments have.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jeffbinlawrence View Post
                            My concern is some of the issues that have come up with the folks who have had long term assignments on the ISS. There have been some pretty bad physical effects..impact to eyesight, muscle/bone deterioration among other things. What if the humans in our current form aren't capable of surviving long deep space journeys?
                            I wonder if we could use CRISPR to help with this. Especially for deep space travel. I read a fiction novel where they did something like this, specializing humans for the rigors of deep space through genetic engineering. I don’t remember what it was called though.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jeffbinlawrence View Post
                              My concern is some of the issues that have come up with the folks who have had long term assignments on the ISS. There have been some pretty bad physical effects..impact to eyesight, muscle/bone deterioration among other things. What if the humans in our current form aren't capable of surviving long deep space journeys?
                              Bone mineral density, BMD, decreases substantially in space. Essentially the BMD loss after 1 month in space is equal to the BMD loss of an elderly woman in 1 year. As of now no one has broken a bone in space, and researchers are trying to create models for how the fracture healing process might work. I know of one team using sheep (bone structure similar to humans) to increase the data available for creating computer models that won't require the invasive nature of the current experiments. Another issue with the loss of BMD in space is the body doesn't return to its original levels of bone resorption and creation after spending significant time on Earth again. The physiological changes associated with prolonged space travel are a huge barrier currently.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X