Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

This is my science thread

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Oh, I read the riddle and then misremembered that the Mediterranean Sea had more salinity. 86 my previous response. I’ll go with the Mediterranean instead.

    Comment


    • Picture of earth behind a flower grown on the International Space Station

      Last edited by JayhawkLifer; 2 hours ago.

      Comment


      • They copies that from WALL-E

        Comment


        • Originally posted by WolfShirtSophomore View Post
          They copies that from WALL-E
          Or they could be seeing how zero gravity affects plant growth/flowering?

          Comment


          • Originally posted by FrobozMumbar View Post

            Or they could be seeing how zero gravity affects plant growth/flowering?
            Nope, copiers.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by WolfShirtSophomore View Post
              Ok fellow science nerds. I encountered this "puzzle" the other night and I'd like others to chime in on my thinking.

              Proposed question. Does a boat (the same boat), ride higher, lower or the same in the Mediterranean Sea than it does at the equator in the Atlantic Ocean.

              1st Answer (which was my initial instinct), It will ride higher because the Med Sea has more salinity, thereby increasing the buoyancy.

              2nd Answer proposed by a "professor", it would ride lower because the earth is an oblate spheroid and in the Med Sea the boat would be closer to the center of earth, thus it would get pulled down harder by gravity.

              A person with the first answer proposed that the 2nd answer is wrong because the increased gravity is the same for the water. Thus negating the effect.

              Now for my full analyses, and this is where I'd like someone else to chime and tell me where I go astray if I do.

              As far as I know the increased gravity on the water would have no effect on the buoyancy, as that is more related to density (hence > salinity = greater buoyancy). Therefore, the gravity argument on the boat is still valid. However, the oblateness of the earth is so miniscule that it would probably be irrelevant, or at least have less of an effect than the salinity. Therefore, final answer is it would either ride higher, but maybe only so much that it basically amounts to "the same".

              Thoughts?
              I agree with your answer. I think that the significantly higher salinity in the Mediterranean Sea would have a greater effect than the miniscule difference in gravity at the equator compared to the Mediterranean. However, I also agree with Gard that there is insufficient data to create a mathematical model that would demonstrate the difference.

              My suspicion is that if you took the same boat floating in the Atlantic Ocean at the equator and compared how much of the boat is above water to the same boat at the same latitude but still in the Atlantic Ocean (same salinity, removing one variable) that the difference in gravity would be so little that the change in ride height could not be measured. However, I also suspect that if you compare the boat at the same latitude in the Atlantic vs in the middle of the Mediterranean that the difference probably could be measured.

              Comment


              • In my feeble little brain, it seems to me that salinity would affect buoyancy on something submerged in the water as opposed to displacement of an object floating on the surface. But perhaps it affects both equally.

                Comment


                • Saline makes women’s boobs ride higher so I assume it would do the same for ships. Science is science.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by FrobozMumbar View Post
                    Saline makes women’s boobs ride higher so I assume it would do the same for ships. Science is science.
                    We'll need picture or video citations on this one.

                    Comment


                    • Comment

                      Working...
                      X